University of Amanda
Seeking.com

Buying a used car

superman007

Member
Sep 11, 2014
34
7
8
Since you decided going to a dealership and doing financing, you should get a certified pre-owned vehicle. This would be cheaper in interest rate and you get longer warranty. Usually, you get 5 or 6 years of factory warranty from the in-service date.
 

ddcanz

curmudgeon
Feb 27, 2012
2,762
10
36
right here and now
100% agree. They are intentionally under engineered by Chrysler.

Several class action lawsuits over the past 2 decades for failing brakes at < 30K km

I was a pain in the ass at Richmond Chrysler in the service Dept. Several other disgruntled customers were chiming in about their shitty brakes. Service rep said it was my driving. I pointed out my Japanese cars had same brakes with > 75K km's.


I couldn't wait to dump that lease back on their lot.

https://topclassactions.com/lawsuit...774-dodge-journey-brake-class-action-lawsuit/
Things have obviously changed regarding Dodge Ram brakes.
Bought my Big Horn new in 2013 with the new 8 speed tranny. Just got my first brake job done- at 120,000 kms.
Absolutely fucking unheard of for a light truck!
My experience with various Rams and Fords over the years has been 60-80,000 kms maximum before the pads are gone and the rotors start getting scored.
Driving tendencies can play a big role- I've really slowed down a lot on the roads over the years and put less wear on the brakes. It's made a difference.
 

bobjob

Active member
Oct 11, 2015
514
42
28
Things have obviously changed regarding Dodge Ram brakes.
Bought my Big Horn new in 2013 with the new 8 speed tranny. Just got my first brake job done- at 120,000 kms.
Absolutely fucking unheard of for a light truck!
My experience with various Rams and Fords over the years has been 60-80,000 kms maximum before the pads are gone and the rotors start getting scored.
Driving tendencies can play a big role- I've really slowed down a lot on the roads over the years and put less wear on the brakes. It's made a difference.
My '07 Ram has had the brake done 3 times, and it's at 375,000km. It has the stock exhaust brake which helps a ton, but I also tow a 16' loaded cargo trailer daily and a 27' 5th wheel a few times a year. My next truck will most certainly be another Ram! I hated Dodge trucks until I bought one...
 

ddcanz

curmudgeon
Feb 27, 2012
2,762
10
36
right here and now
My '07 Ram has had the brake done 3 times, and it's at 375,000km. It has the stock exhaust brake which helps a ton, but I also tow a 16' loaded cargo trailer daily and a 27' 5th wheel a few times a year. My next truck will most certainly be another Ram! I hated Dodge trucks until I bought one...
My '99 Laramie was the best truck I ever owned. One of the only manual 5-speeds ever made (I'm told).
Traded it in because I had to replace the rear end and was afraid of future maintenance. (was a lease return- I think the original owner drove the fuck out of it and over-towed). What a mistake!
My next was a 2006 Ram. 4.7l weak-assed POS that was nothing but trouble and was TERRIBLE on gas. Smaller V-8 had to work too hard. Hated it! But got solid trade value for it when I bought my current 2013 BH. 5.7l hemi with 8-speed auto- huge power, rocket acceleration for passing and very decent mileage (hey- it's still a FS pickup that I carry loads with).
But to each their own- others swear by Ford, Chev etc. and you can't tell them otherwise. Whatever works!
 

VanIsleGuy46

Member
May 22, 2016
337
1
18
Victoria BC
Really? 4 door automatic? Claire you need to be in a boorish musclular car with rumbling exhaust and a shaky idle.

Maybe something like a 5 Litre Mustang convertible and a nice vibrating 8 ball stuck shift!

Let the sun shine in and the hair flow. Something that makes you squeal with delight the way I know you can.

Cheers......
 

pro-boner

Love to Eat Pussy!
Aug 1, 2014
301
5
18
In Pussyland
If it is just transportation, buy what ever the cabbies drive. There are lots of them on the road, parts are cheap, and the junk yards are full of parts for them.

I am on my second Impala, most reliable and easy to fix car I have ever had. The model I have has fold flat back seats and I can shove 185 cm skis in the back no problem. Try doing that with an SUV, they are small in the back. My Chevy can take two mountain bikes in the back. Bike, golf clubs, camping gear, giant cooler. Gas mileage is not bad, runs around 7 on the highway. 3.5 engine, so power is good and it loafs on the highway at 1800rpm. Did rotors and pads on the front at 140k.. $235.00 2 hours of my time.
Sway bar replaced, $250.00, parts, beer and lunch. 2 hours, and that is it.
 

Theguyfromvictoria

Active member
Dec 4, 2014
572
207
43
The Island
Since you decided going to a dealership and doing financing, you should get a certified pre-owned vehicle. This would be cheaper in interest rate and you get longer warranty. Usually, you get 5 or 6 years of factory warranty from the in-service date.
Yes to this. A Certified Pre-Owned is the way to go. But I caution you that every manufacturer has drastically different standards for what they deem to be a 'certified' pre-owned.
Shockingly, I believe it is Ford who offers the 'best' CPO vehicle in the market in terms of consumer protection.
 

80watts

Banned
May 20, 2004
1,878
278
83
Victoria
Ms Monet, just wondering in this day and age if you bought some friends with you when you go shopping for a car. Have them distract the sales person(s)..... :)
 

Claire Monet

Active member
Apr 28, 2014
1,111
0
36
Vancouver
www.clairemonet.com
I'll admit I haven't read everything here as the talk of engines and such just doesn't interest me/has eluded me... I've been appreciative of all the feedback that has been relevant, and carry on with your shop-talk.

I just need a good car that will run efficiently and reliably (Toyota/Honda?). I have a great contact for a mechanic in Vancouver who worked on my Toyota and other friend's/family's cars.

Someone brought up to me that since I'm self-employed financing would be difficult at a dealership... So me thinks paying all in cash for a pre-owned car would be the way to go--??
 

bdan

New member
Apr 11, 2015
221
0
0
Someone brought up to me that since I'm self-employed financing would be difficult at a dealership... So me thinks paying all in cash for a pre-owned car would be the way to go--??
I've been self employed since I was 17 and have never had a problem getting financing.
That may depend totally on your reported income and bank statements however.

But I have paid cash for a couple as well. Depends on your situation. Not impossible.

EDIT: As a slightly humorous aside. Before I was out of my teens I could get financing for a vehicle\house\property no problem.

But couldn't get a credit card because apparently young people are irresponsible. :confused:
 

LM987

Active member
Dec 28, 2015
345
33
28
I'll admit I haven't read everything here as the talk of engines and such just doesn't interest me/has eluded me... I've been appreciative of all the feedback that has been relevant, and carry on with your shop-talk.

I just need a good car that will run efficiently and reliably (Toyota/Honda?). I have a great contact for a mechanic in Vancouver who worked on my Toyota and other friend's/family's cars.

Someone brought up to me that since I'm self-employed financing would be difficult at a dealership... So me thinks paying all in cash for a pre-owned car would be the way to go--??
If you are self employed and report your income, your Tax return & NOA will work just fine for car financing. If you are paying cash, and it's over $10,000, get ready for a LOT of questions as to the source of the cash. FINTRAC sucks for cash transactions.
 

Muffdiver69

Member
Sep 27, 2007
183
6
18
one thing to keep in mind is cars with Direct Injection. Search google for carbon build up direct injection. Sure looks like a scary maintenance problem if you plan on keeping the car a while.
Basically, fuel is sprayed directly into the cylinder instead of the intake port, that nice detergent gas is not sprayed on the back of the intake valves. So you get a build up of carbon with direct injection because the valves do not get "washed" by gas as it is with port injection.

Almost all new cars have direct injection now. Some have a combo of both direct and port injection (Toyota and Nissan to name two). When i was car shopping in 2016 i got a Honda Civic EX-HS with the 2.0L port injection motor. Been a great car so far. Do not use it too much tho. Got it in July 2016 and it still only has 16600 ish KM on it. I also have 3 bikes i use for short trips. A regular pedal bike. An electric mountain bike and a Honda NC750x motorcycle. Nice weather i am on motorcycle. Short trips one of the bikes. Usually the car for Sunday shopping. Always make sure i go longer distance in the car. I live downtown and the Costco is a few blocks away. But i will go to Coquitlam or Willingdon for that.
 

MissingOne

awake but not woke
Jan 2, 2006
2,120
268
83
...If you are paying cash, and it's over $10,000, get ready for a LOT of questions as to the source of the cash. FINTRAC sucks for cash transactions.
I'm self-employed, and I always pay cash for vehicles. The most recent time was two years ago, when I paid a bit over $10,000. There's never been any issue, and there have never been any inquiries from any authorities.
 

bdan

New member
Apr 11, 2015
221
0
0
As a British Columbia notary public or British Columbia notary corporation, you must identify individuals and confirm the existence of entities for certain activities and transactions, as listed below. Entities can be corporations, trusts, partnerships, funds, and unincorporated associations or organizations.
I'm not that bright but what this has to do with purchasing a car leaves me baffled. Why would you use a notary in that instance?