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Thread: Speciesism (Certain lives being deemed more worthy than the other)

  1. #31
    Quote Originally Posted by clu View Post
    Yup. #2 is the traditional meaning. #1 is the misinterpretation that usurped it. See https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Begging_the_question



    Right. Everybody needs to eat. It's just that herbivores can synthesise some that carnivores typically can't.
    Google did say, "Cows and other herbivores cannot synthesize all the amino acids they need". Not that I think that Google is the last word in everything but at this point all that I'm certain of here, from what you and Google have said, is that cows and other herbivores either do or don't synthesis all the amino acids they need. Didn't find any literature to clarify. Only that humans synthesis 11 of the 20 amino acids and refer to 9 "essential" amino acids that humans can't synthesis. And that ruminants ferment cellulose to utilize amino acids deep in the cellulose. However, no suggestion that cellulose contains all 20 amino acids.

    Did find from Google plant sources that contain essential amino acids:

    The 9 Essential Amino Acids:

    Sources of Leucine: cheese, soybeans, beef, pork, chicken, pumpkin, seeds, nuts, peas, tuna, seafood, beans, whey protein, plant proteins, etc.
    Sources of Isoleucine: soy, meat and fish, dairy and eggs, cashews, almonds, oats, lentils, beans, brown rice, legumes, chia seeds.
    Sources of Lysine: eggs, meat, poultry, beans, peas, cheese, chia seeds, spirulina, parsley, avocados, almonds, cashews, whey protein.
    Sources of Methionine: meat, fish, cheese, dairy, beans, seeds, chia seeds, brazil nuts, oats, wheat, figs, whole grain rice, beans, legumes, onions, and cacao.

    Sources of Phenylalanine: milk and dairy, meat, fish, chicken, eggs, spirulina, seaweed, pumpkin, beans, rice, avocado, almonds, peanuts, quinoa, figs, raisins, leafy greens, most berries, olives, and seeds.

    Sources of threonine: lean meat, cheese, nuts, seeds, lentils, watercress and spirulina, pumpkin, leafy greens, hemp seeds, chia seeds, soybeans, almonds, avocados, figs, raisins, and quinoa.

    Sources of tryptophan: chocolate, milk, cheese, turkey, red meat, yogurt, eggs, fish, poultry, chickpeas, almonds, sunflower seed, pepitas, spirulina, bananas, and peanuts.

    Sources of valine include: cheese, red meat, chicken, pork, nuts, beans, spinach, legumes, broccoli, seeds, chia seeds, whole grains, figs, avocado, apples, blueberries, cranberries, oranges, and apricots.

    Sources of Histidine: red meat, cheese, white meat and poultry, seafood, soybeans, beans, legumes, chia seeds, buckwheat, potatoes.

  2. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by licks2nite View Post
    Google did say, "Cows and other herbivores cannot synthesize all the amino acids they need". Not that I think that Google is the last word in everything but at this point all that I'm certain of here, from what you and Google have said, is that cows and other herbivores either do or don't synthesis all the amino acids they need. Didn't find any literature to clarify.
    If cows could synthesise everything they wouldn't need to eat plants. I think the gist is plants synthesise some things, then herbivore animals eat them and synthesise the rest, and then carnivores eat the herbivores, hence food chain. I don't think there's any contradiction here.

  3. #33
    Didn't want to "sign in" to watch any youtube videos. According to the opening Wickpedia article, speciesism is a form of discrimination based on species membership. For my personal perspective, domestic animals are symbiotic with humans and couldn't survive without humans.

    Affording "rights" toward animals the way that humans have rights would have to demand responsibilities of animals. Not sure how anybody is going to demand responsibilities of animals. For humans, it had been said, the only "right" that is worth anything is a right to be left alone. Humans certainly didn't leave the wolf alone when humans selectively bred different wolf traits that created all the different breeds of dogs. For a dog, the dog has a responsibility to be loyal to a master to preserve the symbiosis. The cow has a responsibility to produce milk to preserve the symbiosis. A steer gives up its life like a soldier on a battlefield to preserve the symbiosis of its species. House and barn cats are quite unique in having hardly changed since voluntarily taking up residency with humans. For wild animals such as threatened Giant Panda, Pacific Walrus, Magellanic Penguin, Leatherback Turtle, Mountain Gorilla, Javan Rhinoceros, Orangutan, Sumatran Elephant, Tiger each require the right that humans most overlook for themselves, the right to be left alone.

  4. #34
    Redheaded Temptress
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    Quote Originally Posted by licks2nite View Post
    Google did say, "Cows and other herbivores cannot synthesize all the amino acids they need". Not that I think that Google is the last word in everything but at this point all that I'm certain of here, from what you and Google have said, is that cows and other herbivores either do or don't synthesis all the amino acids they need. Didn't find any literature to clarify. Only that humans synthesis 11 of the 20 amino acids and refer to 9 "essential" amino acids that humans can't synthesis. And that ruminants ferment cellulose to utilize amino acids deep in the cellulose. However, no suggestion that cellulose contains all 20 amino acids.

    Did find from Google plant sources that contain essential amino acids:

    The 9 Essential Amino Acids:

    Sources of Leucine: cheese, soybeans, beef, pork, chicken, pumpkin, seeds, nuts, peas, tuna, seafood, beans, whey protein, plant proteins, etc.
    Sources of Isoleucine: soy, meat and fish, dairy and eggs, cashews, almonds, oats, lentils, beans, brown rice, legumes, chia seeds.
    Sources of Lysine: eggs, meat, poultry, beans, peas, cheese, chia seeds, spirulina, parsley, avocados, almonds, cashews, whey protein.
    Sources of Methionine: meat, fish, cheese, dairy, beans, seeds, chia seeds, brazil nuts, oats, wheat, figs, whole grain rice, beans, legumes, onions, and cacao.

    Sources of Phenylalanine: milk and dairy, meat, fish, chicken, eggs, spirulina, seaweed, pumpkin, beans, rice, avocado, almonds, peanuts, quinoa, figs, raisins, leafy greens, most berries, olives, and seeds.

    Sources of threonine: lean meat, cheese, nuts, seeds, lentils, watercress and spirulina, pumpkin, leafy greens, hemp seeds, chia seeds, soybeans, almonds, avocados, figs, raisins, and quinoa.

    Sources of tryptophan: chocolate, milk, cheese, turkey, red meat, yogurt, eggs, fish, poultry, chickpeas, almonds, sunflower seed, pepitas, spirulina, bananas, and peanuts.

    Sources of valine include: cheese, red meat, chicken, pork, nuts, beans, spinach, legumes, broccoli, seeds, chia seeds, whole grains, figs, avocado, apples, blueberries, cranberries, oranges, and apricots.

    Sources of Histidine: red meat, cheese, white meat and poultry, seafood, soybeans, beans, legumes, chia seeds, buckwheat, potatoes.
    Looks like we can get all essential amino acids from plants while avoiding unnecessary cholesterol, saturated fat and the inflammatory byproducts that come from metabolising non-essential amino acids ( all of which our body can also synthesize effectively given, you have a properly planned diet)

    We should be more worried about fiber deficiency than a protein deficiency in civilized society.

    Nutritionfacts.org

    Canadafoodguide.org

    -WFPB nutrition student

  5. #35
    High Priestess
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    Quote Originally Posted by YoungMissRayne View Post
    Looks like we can get all essential amino acids from plants while avoiding unnecessary cholesterol, saturated fat and the inflammatory byproducts that come from metabolising non-essential amino acids ( all of which our body can also synthesize effectively given, you have a properly planned diet)

    We should be more worried about fiber deficiency than a protein deficiency in civilized society.

    Nutritionfacts.org

    Canadafoodguide.org

    -WFPB nutrition student
    What is your opinion on the ketogenic diet?
    Downtown Vancouver & Richmond
    604-618-5075 TEXT ONLY
    [email protected]
    Twitter @DeviousMissH

  6. #36
    Redheaded Temptress
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    Quote Originally Posted by Miss Hunter View Post
    What is your opinion on the ketogenic diet?
    Ah the keto diet aka rehashed atkins diet. My peers recommend not to do it for longer than 5 days. The lowered pH from digesting such a high amount of proteins and fats can cause liver and kidney damage. A diet high in animal proteins can also cause HDL cholesterol to build up to unsafe levels. Ketosis is your body going into survival mode; it's great for quick weight loss but detrimental to your long term health. Check your urinary PH or blood ketones along with your LDL/HDL levels to make sure you're not causing any permanent damage if, you choose to continue with such an extreme diet. Carbs are not the enemy; processed foods are the cause of many ailments.

    A good balance of compex carbohydrates and plant-based protein is necessary for longevity.

    Source-

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6339822/.

    Check out figure 1.
    Last edited by YoungMissRayne; Yesterday at 11:26 PM.

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by YoungMissRayne View Post
    Ah the keto diet aka rehashed atkins diet. My peers recommend not to do it for longer than 5 days. The heightened pH from digesting such a high amount of proteins and fats can cause liver and kidney damage. A diet high in animal proteins can also cause HDL cholesterol to build up to unsafe levels. Ketosis is your body going into survival mode; it's great for quick weight loss but detrimental to your long term health. Check your urinary PH or blood ketones along with your LDL/HDL levels to make sure you're not causing any permanent damage if, you choose to continue with such an extreme diet. Carbs are not the enemy; processed foods are the cause of many ailments.

    A good balance of compex carbohydrates and plant-based protein is necessary for longevity.

    Source-

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6339822/.

    Check out figure 1.
    I'd have to agree with your comment on putting your body into survival mode...there are many times I will eat only one meal a day, and work my tail off....not healthy.
    Avoiding processed foods is also very good advice....except Pizza, it doesn't count in the " World According To Sy Handbook"

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